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Coffee Consumption Can Reduce Risk of Liver Cirrhosis

Coffee Consumption Can Reduce Risk of Liver Cirrhosis

A population-based observational study from Singapore suggests that drinking coffee may help lower the risk of liver cirrhosis. More than 63,000 Chinese-speaking subjects were recruited between 1993 and 1998. They were followed for approximately 15 years.

The volunteers were queried about their use of beverages, particularly soft drinks, green tea, black tea, coffee and alcohol. Heavy use of alcohol increased the risk of liver cirrhosis, but participants who drank at least two cups of coffee daily were 66 percent less likely to die of nonviral hepatitis. There was no association between coffee consumption and viral hepatitis.

[Hepatology, April 2, 2014]

This is not the first report to suggest that coffee can have health benefits. Earlier studies have shown that coffee drinkers have a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes and of experiencing a recurrence of prostate cancer. A study in mice showed that coffee can reduce the amount of fat stored in the liver, which could well help account for the protective effect against nonviral hepatitis. 

It is important to know that coffee can interact with certain medications. Italian scientists have found that coffee reduces the absorption of levothyroxine (Synthroid) if they are taken at the same time (Thyroid, March 2008). We offer more information about thyroid medication in our Guide to Thyroid Hormones.

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About the Author
Terry Graedon, PhD, is a medical anthropologist and co-host of The People’s Pharmacy radio show, co-author of The People’s Pharmacy syndicated newspaper columns and numerous books, and co-founder of The People’s Pharmacy website. Terry taught in the Duke University School of Nursing and was an adjunct assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology. She is a Fellow of the Society of Applied Anthropology. Terry is one of the country's leading authorities on the science behind folk remedies. .
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