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Can You Remove Skin Tags With a Remedy?

Dermatologists can remove skin tags by cutting or freezing them, but many readers prefer to try home remedies. One favorite: tie a thread tightly around it.
Can You Remove Skin Tags With a Remedy?
Skin tag or acrochondon or soft fibroma is a safe. It have not effect to the body. It usually occurs at neck face armpits and body.

Have you wondered about skin tags? These little growths are not dangerous, but they certainly can be annoying. They tend to grow in places where they may encounter the friction of skin rubbing against skin. Consequently, people may find them uncomfortable and many folks also find them unsightly. Doctors remove skin tags by snipping, freezing or shaving them off (StatPearls, March 24, 2020). If the skin tag is too small to grab with tweezers, the doctor may use an electrodesiccation technique. (But if the growth is that small, do you really need to destroy it?) Some people have utilized home remedies to get rid of these tags.

How You Can Remove Skin Tags:

Q. I have a lot of skin tags on my neck. What causes them? Is there a safe way to remove skin tags? I’d especially appreciate any home remedies.

A. Skin tags are small fleshy growths that occur in the armpits, on the neck or sometimes even on the eyelids. They may have a little stalk, and they are the same color as the rest of your skin.

Nobody knows what causes skin tags, but they seem to be more common among older people. In addition, doctors report that they may be associated with obesity and diabetes. Since you have a lot of them on your neck, you should ask your doctor to check for diabetes or metabolic syndrome (Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research, Mar-Apr. 2014). Detecting a metabolic problem would be much more important to your health than getting rid of the skin tags.

Home Remedies for Removal:

Some readers have had success coating skin tags with liquid bandage. Others apply castor oil. One old-fashioned approach is to have someone tie a length of thread or dental floss tightly around the base of the skin tag. This is said to cut off the blood supply, and the tag falls off.

Unfortunately, we have not seen any clinical trials of these remedies to remove skin tags. If you decide to try one, please tell us what you did and whether or not it worked. 

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About the Author
Terry Graedon, PhD, is a medical anthropologist and co-host of The People’s Pharmacy radio show, co-author of The People’s Pharmacy syndicated newspaper columns and numerous books, and co-founder of The People’s Pharmacy website. Terry taught in the Duke University School of Nursing and was an adjunct assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology. She is a Fellow of the Society of Applied Anthropology. Terry is one of the country's leading authorities on the science behind folk remedies. .
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Citations
  • Belgam Syed SY et al, "Acrochordon." StatPearls, March 24, 2020.
  • Shah R et al, "Acrochordons as a cutaneous sign of metabolic syndrome: A case-control study." Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research, Mar-Apr. 2014. doi: 10.4103/2141-9248.129040
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