Humans are sociable creatures, by and large. New research techniques allow scientists to analyze our networks of family, friends and acquaintances. How do the friends of our friends affect our emotions–and our health? Harvard professor Nicholas Christakis has answers on how social networks can influence smoking, weight, or even sexual behavior.
Guest: Nicholas Christakis, MD, PhD, is a professor at Harvard University with joint appointments in the Departments of Health Care Policy, Sociology and Medicine. He is the author, with James Fowler, PhD, of Connected: The Surprising Power of Our Social Networks and How They Shape Our Lives.
The website is: connectedthebook.com
The podcast of this program will be available the Monday after the broadcast date. Podcasts can be downloaded for free for six weeks after the date of broadcast. After that time has passed, digital downloads are available for $2.99. CDs may be purchased at any time after broadcast for $9.99.

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  1. PP
    Reply

    Our military are now using “sociometric connections” to help locate the most critical person in enemy groups preparing and positioning IEDs. If they take that person out, it limits the ability of putting them out. Isn’t that a good health outcome from this kind of research!

  2. Marilyn
    Reply

    Thank you for “connecting” me to this eye-opening and powerful website and the work of the people on TED.com and their amazing talks and the wonderful connections they are making showing us all how “it simply depends on us” to make a difference to change the world to lasting peace. Looking forward to reading “Connected” and listening in to TED talks in order to continue to help myself and others with these “first step” insights. . .Bless You.

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