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Terazosin

Terazosin

Overview

Hytrin (generic name terasozin) is a blood pressure medicine that relaxes the muscles lining the blood vessels. This reduces their resistance to blood flow.

This same action, of smooth muscle relaxation, is often helpful in managing the urinary difficulties that may result from an enlarged prostate gland (benign prostatic hypertrophy).

Side Effects and Interactions of Hyrtin (terasozin)

The most common side effects of Hytrin are lightheadedness or dizziness when standing up from sitting or lying down. Even after you have been taking Hytrin for some time, this effect is more likely within the first few hours after swallowing the pill.

Palpitations and occasionally fainting may also occur.

Other side effects include a feeling of tiredness or weakness, headaches, nausea, fluid build-up in arms and legs, weight gain, drowsiness, nasal stuffiness, and blurred vision. Tell your doctor about any symptoms you experience.

Few interactions have been reported between Hytrin and other drugs.

If other blood pressure drugs must be added, keep in mind that the first-dose effect may crop up and exercise precautions against fainting and falling.

Special Precautions with Hyrtin (terasozin)

Hytrin can cause a potentially dangerous “first-dose effect” soon after you begin taking it. A person may feel faint or dizzy, especially when they stand up from sitting or lying down. This is apparently due to excessive lowering of the blood pressure at first.

Your doctor will probably start you on a low dose of Hytrin and gradually increase it to reduce this problem. Remember that if you miss a few doses, starting again could produce this first-dose effect.

Avoid driving and other dangerous activities for at least 12 hours after your first pill or after resuming medication.

Don’t stand up suddenly without holding on to something.

Taking the Medicine

Hytrin is started as a 1 mg pill given at bedtime.

The dose will be increased gradually until the response is satisfactory.

Your doctor will tell you if you should take it once or twice a day.

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About the Author
Joe Graedon is a pharmacologist who has dedicated his career to making drug information understandable to consumers. His best-selling book, The People’s Pharmacy, was published in 1976 and led to a syndicated newspaper column, syndicated public radio show and web site. In 2006, Long Island University awarded him an honorary doctorate as “one of the country's leading drug experts for the consumer.” .
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