lower blood sugar safely, cinnamon in coffee

Cinnamon was once highly prized as an exotic spice. The ancient Egyptians used cinnamon along with thyme and cumin to embalm their pharaohs. A far more practical use was for preserving meat during medieval times. Cinnamon has a fascinating pharmacology. In recent years, scientists have discovered that cinnamon can help control blood sugar. Here is such a story from a reader of our syndicated newspaper column.

Is There Science that Cinnamon Can Help Control Blood Sugar?

Q. After reading that cinnamon can help control blood sugar, I decided to try it. I eat a little bit of ground cinnamon when I eat sweets or anything like white bread that quickly turns to sugar.

Before, if I ate dessert at night or even French toast for breakfast, I felt terrible after about 45 minutes or so. Now if I want something like that, I eat a little cinnamon before or during my meal. I do not feel bad at all.

I had my blood sugar tested and was told it was normal, but I still felt crummy if I ate anything sweet. This cinnamon trick has been a help.

A. Cinnamon can help reduce the rapid rise in blood sugar that happens after eating something that is quickly digested, like sugar or white bread (Journal of Diabetes Research, online July 14, 2015).

Cinnamon can be taken as powder or tea, but we think tea is better. The components of cinnamon that lower blood sugar are water soluble, so they are carried safely in tea. Coumarin is a toxic compound that is found in some cinnamon. It is not water soluble but you could get some in ground cinnamon. That’s why we urge you not to overdo on this spice.

Ellie shared her trick for extracting the water soluble part of cinnamon:

“Our family has been adding cinnamon to our pot of coffee for years. We put a mixture of cinnamon and cacao powder (no sugar included) into the coffee filter. Then, we put another filter on top of the cinnamon-cacao filter in which we put the coffee. It makes a slight chocolate-cinnamon flavor to the coffee to go with added health benefits. Yumm!”

Not All Cinnamon Can Help Control Blood Sugar Equally:

Not all cinnamon in the supermarket is the same. Cinnamomum cassia, the most common type, has more coumarin than Cinnamomum vera, Ceylon cinnamon. You can  find out which is better for blood sugar control at this link. Of course anyone who tries the cinnamon approach needs to monitor blood glucose very carefully to 1) make sure it is working and 2) make sure it is not working too well. A physician’s supervision is also necessary when treating diabetes!

You can learn more about this fascinating spice and get recipes for its use in our book, Spice Up Your Health: How Everyday Kitchen Herbs & Spikes Can Lengthen & Strengthen Your Life. You will also learn about anise, basil, caraway, chamomile, coriander, cumin, fennel, garlic, ginger, lavender, lemon balm, oregano, rosemary, sage, thyme, turmeric and vanilla.

It may be ordered at this link.

To order by mail, please send a check for $15.95 plus $4 shipping and handling to:

  • Graedon Enterprises; SUYH;
  • PO Box 52027
  • Durham, NC 27717-2027

Get The Graedons' Favorite Home Remedies Health Guide for FREE

Join our daily email newsletter with breaking health news, prescription drug information, home remedies AND you'll get a copy of our brand new full-length health guide — for FREE!

  1. Betty
    Texas
    Reply

    I cannot eat cassia cinnamon, as it makes my mouth feel raw. I used Saigon cinnamon until I read about the excessive amount of coumarin in it. Now I use Ceylon which is sometimes hard to find at the grocery store. I cannot attest to the effect on blood sugar, but it does seem to help my blood pressure.

    • Eve
      Georgia
      Reply

      I have started taking Cinnamon Bark Essential Oil, 2 drops in an empty veggie cap twice a day with meals. Glucose levels have improved.

  2. Larry
    central New York
    Reply

    I’m a type 2 diabetic on 1000mg metformin 2x per day. I use Ceylon cinnamin every morning in my coffee filter and have been for about a year. To date I don’t notice any effect on my sugar levels.

What Do You Think?

We invite you to share your thoughts with others, but remember that our comment section is a public forum. Please do not use your full first and last name if you want to keep details of your medical history anonymous. A first name and last initial or a pseudonym is acceptable. Advice from other commenters on this website is not a substitute for medical attention. Do not stop any medicine without checking with the prescriber. Stopping medication suddenly could result in serious harm. We expect comments to be civil in tone and language. By commenting, you agree to abide by our commenting policy and website terms & conditions. Comments that do not follow these policies will not be posted. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Your cart

Total
USD
Shipping and discount codes are added at checkout.