psilocybin

Cluster headaches cause excruciating pain. Even worse than that, these one-sided headaches return in unpredictable cycles (hence the name “cluster” headaches). Anticipation makes the pain even worse. Moreover, these cycles, once started, can be difficult to disrupt. No wonder some people are willing to entertain extreme therapies.

What Works for Cluster Headaches?

Q. I’ve had cluster headaches for 20 years. Out of everything I’ve tried, there are only three things that work.

To ABORT a headache, I inhale pure oxygen and without fail, it is gone in 5 to 10 minutes. It’s a true wonder drug!

Imitrex Nasal Inhaler also works, but it’s slower than oxygen and extremely expensive.

To PREVENT clusters of headaches, I take several modest doses a year of psilocybin in the form of mushroom tea. I have some minor psychedelic effects, and the next day I have a lasting sense of positive self-confidence. A 2006 study at Harvard showed significant remission of clusters in people using small doses of psilocybin.

I’ve taken psilocybin over 50 times in the past several years. I still have cluster headaches but they are very few, far less intense and easily stopped with oxygen. Other sufferers in my Facebook group have obtained total relief.

Managing the Pain of Cluster Headaches:

A. Cluster headaches produce excruciating pain so intense that the multiple attacks have been described as suicide headaches. That’s in part because it is impossible to function during a bout of repeated searing one-sided head pain.

Treating Headaches:

High-flow oxygen is a treatment of choice for cluster headaches. So are triptan-type nasal sprays (Robbins et al, Headache, July, 2016).

What About Psilocybin?

Psilocybin is a hallucinogen derived from mushrooms. The FDA considers it a Schedule I drug, meaning that it has no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse. That said, some studies suggest that psilocybin may be beneficial against these killer headaches (Sewell et al, Neurology, Jun. 27, 2006; Schindler et al, Journal of Psychoactive Drugs, Nov-Dec. 2015).

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  1. J
    Illinois
    Reply

    Using Psilocybe and to treat cluster headaches is very interesting but can anyone tell me what a mild dose would be? It has been many years since I used psilocybin and then it was to obtain a psychedelic high so I’m a little unsure of how to use it to treat cluster headaches.

  2. Sydney
    Reply

    Where can you buy this tea?

  3. Gina
    Georgia
    Reply

    I have had episodic cluster headaches for 26 years. Now I’m chronic for over a year. I’ve taken over 50 different meds in that time. Desperation came with the Loss of my job, house, and everything I own from being uable to work. I gave magic mushrooms a chance in small doses every 5 days. I was pain free for 28 days!!

    The headaches resumed, and I can’t find anymore mushrooms. I don’t understand why i can be on 5 medications that don’t work but the government won’t allow me a small piece of plant without making me a criminal! Please let things change soon!

  4. Anne
    Bakersfield, Ca.
    Reply

    Oxygen is a fantastic cure for cluster headaches! It is the only thing that works for my husband.

  5. Jim
    Houston
    Reply

    From a former sufferer of cluster headaches, I would say Congress would immediate legalize the drug if they had the headaches. The pain is indescribable.

  6. Jerry Bryan
    Reply

    Does the oxygen therapy work for migraine headaches?

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