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Natural Inflammation Fighters

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Q. What can I substitute for aspirin to ease pain without stomach problems? Will it thin the blood as well?

If inflammation in the body is a problem, what home remedy will help reduce it?

A. Aspirin is the gold standard for anti-inflammatory pain relief. Doctors often recommend aspirin for people at risk of heart disease. New research also suggests that aspirin reduces the likelihood of certain common cancers (Lancet Oncology, online, March 20, 2012).

Despite such benefits, aspirin can cause trouble for many people. Bleeding ulcers are a potentially deadly complication.

Your doctor may be able to prescribe salsalate, which can fight inflammation and may be less irritating to the digestive tract. We are sending you our Guide to Alternatives for Arthritis for more details about salsalate and anti-inflammatory foods that can also thin the blood.

Non-drug options for reducing inflammation include tart cherries, gin-soaked raisins, grape juice, dark chocolate, pineapple, ginger, turmeric and boswellia. You can learn about many of these in our book, The People's Pharmacy Quick & Handy Home Remedies, available in libraries and bookstores as well as online.

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The above is all good. In addition you may want to consider your general diet.
If your sugar and triglycerides are high, it is an indication you are consuming too many carbohydrates. If so, cut way down in sugar consumption and fruit consumption (fructose is sugar). A high protein diet (check w/doc if kidneys are OK) has a diuretic effect and lowers inflammation systemically. If you cut carbohydrates, the substitute is more protein and more fat. Fat is considered safe in a low carbohydrate diet environment.

Cinnamon, ginger, tumeric, cherries -all anti inflammatory -(cherries in can, frozen, fresh etc) grape seed oil may also help with pain... you must use them everyday to get results.

I have found amazing results with turmeric, the Indian spice. Because I don't like the taste, I buy it from online. It comes in 200 capsules for around 13usd. Here is what it has done for me. It has reversed my type 2 diabetes, brought down my HDL, destroyed the arthritis in my legs, hips, and low back.

I take around 4000mg/day, divided but it has been well worth it. I have felt NO side effects, and I feel better than any time in the last 4 years. I researched it and it also prevents a lot of cancers, so I will probably take it for life or until my doctor tells me to stop. My ESR on my blood tests was halved this last time.

To stop any kind of pain, you need at least 2400mg/day. You should start to notice a difference in around 5 days. A friend of ours started taking it for pain in his fingers and the pain halted in just a few days.

Also, Aloe Vera has been proven (as in real scientific studies) to be a VERY powerful anti-inflammatory and immune system booster. It seems to have a DIRECT linear effect -- e.g. the more you take, the better it works. However it also has a built-in self-limiting factor: it will soften your stools. Not to liquid, but a Whole Leaf extract contains one of the more powerful stool softeners in nature. In fact, this substance was once used to relive constipation caused by the use of old-time opium and morphine as pain killers. This substance is still in many 'scripted medications.

I generally tell folks to start with 1 liquid ounce in the AM and one in the PM. Then, in a bout a week, increase to 1 oz in AM and 2 oz. in PM (as you sleep your body goes into 'repair' mode). Then 2 oz. AM and 2 oz. PM. Giving each dose range a while to take effect. If you find that your stools are too soft for comfort, back off a dose and give your body a chance to 'catch up'.

SOME studies SEEM to indicate that there MIGHT be some kidney shrinkage at higher doses, so DO CHECK WITH YOUR PHYSICIAN. If you go to PubMed (the combined site of the National Libraries of Medicine which now holds.
MedLine and MANY other databases) and type in "Aloe Vera" you will find a plethora of information stored in abstracts and some free on-line studies.

The ONLY thing you really need to know is you should buy it in DARK bottles, because both light AND oxygen destroy the chemicals which do the work. So I like to recommend dark brown GLASS bottles, though one company does have a proprietary plastic bottle that blocks light and the transport of oxygen through the plastic. But they also make Aloe Vera Juice and Gel in brown glass bottles. ASK a KNOWLEDGEABLE clerk if you are not sure if the Aloe Vera is 'food grade', especially if you buy a 'gel'.

If you find the taste too strange or offensive, please feel free to mix it with a juice of your choice - I have never seen a study in which a juice negates the effects of Aloe Vera. I find it odd tasting upon first opening the bottle, but after a day the flavor seems to become far more mild. I used in during X-ray therapy for laryngeal cancer and I sure could tell the days when I took it and when I'd run out! But a study of N=1 is just a story, so do, please, go to PubMed and read for yourself.

My quick search just now turned up 86 'hits' for the terms "Aloe Vera AND Inflammation" and a very cursory reading of titles shows nearly all studies show an active anti-inflammatory property. Good luck!

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