Fasting on a regular basis is encouraged by many religions. New evidence from Utah suggests that it may have physical as well as spiritual benefits. The researchers questioned 200 people undergoing angiography to detect heart disease. The patients, mostly Mormons, were asked about fasting. Those who reported fasting once a month were 58 percent less likely to have diseased coronary arteries than those who did not.
[American College of Cardiology, April 3-5, 2011]

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  1. ebm
    Reply

    Fasting without water may save you a few pennies on bottled water, but a great part of
    the health benefits of fasting (unless you are hypoglycemic or diabetic!) is flushing
    out toxins from the body via elimination. You can go without food for many days, but
    water is sooo beneficial and may avert headaches when not eating.
    There are books available on FASTING.

  2. DWD
    Reply

    An interesting study, but I am not sure if the fasting was the key practice because Mormons also do not use caffeine or alcohol. It may be as much their other spiritual practices that benefits their body since we know the mind can affect the body. It would be interesting for future studies to compare against other groups that practice meditation in the form of yoga or other religions such as Buddhists. I suppose non-fasting non-meditating agnostics and atheists could be a control group.
    I tried fasting one day per week during an attempt to lose weight. (It did not work, but I later succeeded with Weight Watchers.) I did drink water and it is not a most pleasant experience. Not sure it would help me at age 64, plus Elsie’s no water fast would mean I could not take my meds. I don’t believe any of mine need to be taken with food though.
    Fasting with only water did put my mind in a different state during the day and an appreciation for 3 meals a day and certainly reminded me that some in this country “fast” because they simply run out of money to purchase food.

  3. elsie
    Reply

    I am a Mormon. Our family observes a fast-day on the first Sunday of each month. We go without food and water from the evening meal on Saturday to the evening meal on Sunday. One main purpose of our fast is to use the money we save from those missed meals to make a “fast offering” to our congregation. Our Bishop uses the collected funds to help needy people in our congregation.

  4. Paul43
    Reply

    I would like the answer also to the Cliff’s question.
    PEOPLE’S PHARMACY RESPONSE: ELSIE HAS GIVEN THE BEST ANSWER IN HER COMMENT.

  5. mph
    Reply

    Again, a good article but no detail!!! Too general!!! Define “fasting” as mentioned in this article!! How long? A day? Did they consume water or nothing at all?
    So many of the questions following articles on this site ask for details. Why don’t you report with more specifics? It would be soooo much more helpful!!!
    PEOPLE’S PHARMACY RESPONSE: APPARENTLY THE IDEAL WOULD BE ONE DAY A MONTH, WATER ONLY.

  6. George
    Reply

    I agree with Cliff. The devil’s in the details. 1 day, 2 days, water only, age, sex, etc.?
    George
    PEOPLE’S PHARMACY RESPONSE: APPARENTLY THE IDEAL WOULD BE ONE DAY A MONTH, WATER ONLY.

  7. C.R.
    Reply

    Any information on what qualified as fasting? There are several fasting definitions and I’m curious how Mormons define fasting.
    Thanks!
    Cliff
    PEOPLE’S PHARMACY RESPONSE: ONE DAY A MONTH, NOTHING BUT WATER.

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