Would you like a great book for your summer vacation? We are proud to offer our daughter’s new novel at a 40% discount. BookRiot recently listed it as one of the Best Books of 2014 So Far:

Earlier this year it got very positive notice in The New York Times Book Review:

Set in the not-too-distant future, when our electronic devices are indispensable for hailing taxis, ordering drinks and helping us understand unfamiliar words, Alena Graedon’s novel, The Word Exchange, explores what happens when we begin to become too reliant on our technology. A computer virus that sweeps through the most popular personal device makes it far more difficult for people to communicate with each other. In fact, the intimate interface between electronic device and neurons means that a dangerous virus, word flu, can and does spread like wildfire.

Reviewers have used words like spectacular, ambitious, scary and funny. It is a mystery, a thriller, a love story and a reflection on the dangers of accelerated obsolescence.

A reviewer for The New Yorker, Peter Baker, in the Page-Turner section on books and the writing life called The Word Exchange a “fast-paced, thrill-a-minute debut novel.”

So, for your summer reading pleasure, we offer a unique father/daughter combination. Buy The Word Exchange at a 40% discount and get a copy of Joe Graedon’s novel No Deadly Drug for free, while supplies last. This summer sale will last till the end of July. Here is a link to The Word Exchage super sale. (Joe’s book is not mentioned but will be added to your package for free while copies are available.)

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  1. MtSL
    Reply

    This is a VERY good read, and I’m looking forward to her next book–I think. The Word Exchange isn’t a fun book or easy to read. It’s a bit sad, though things do sort of work out in the end. The People’s Pharmacy talks about addictions to drugs and withdrawal symptoms, and this book suggests (shouts) that many allow their electronic tools to control them. The withdrawal symptoms can be just as challenging.
    I bought a paper dictionary to look up some of the words because Ms. Graedon has a larger vocabulary than I do to find out that some of the words weren’t in my dictionary because they were made up ones. It seemed unseemly, in a book about how devices are taking over people’s thoughts, to use an electronic one or to get this book in an e-version.
    From the book. “Words, I’ve come to learn, are pulleys through time. Portals into other minds. Without words, what remains? Indecipherable customs. Strange rites. Blighted hearts. Without words, we’re history’s orphans. Our lives and thoughts erased.”

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