While people are still struggling to keep their New Year’s resolutions to lose weight, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is trying to make sure supplement companies don’t take unfair advantage of them. The FTC has announced action against four firms that it says are using deceptive claims to market their weight-loss supplements.

In one case, makers of a powder to be sprinkled on food will have to refund customers millions of dollars and refrain from further marketing unless it has two clinical trials showing that the powder works. A different company was also told that it would need to produce two adequate, well-controlled clinical trials supporting its weight-loss drops.

A third company was selling a skin cream to trim fat; the FTC nixed that claim as well. The final company got into trouble promoting its product through fake news websites. The take-home message for consumers: look for real science. Also, be skeptical: claims that sound too good to be true usually are.

We have spoken with several experts who have tested their weight loss approaches in clinical trials. One of the most popular is the 2-Day Diet. You can listen to a description here. If what you need is to harness your willpower, you may want to listen to our show with Kelly McGonigal, PhD.

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  1. NCL
    Reply

    I’m happy the FTC is finally doing something about weight loss products. I tried that powder you sprinkle over food and what a joke. This was when they offered it only by mail, but I was one of many, I’m sure who didn’t read the fine print that said if you ordered the free sample, the company would send you more every month to the tune of something like $80! Not only did this stuff not work, but I had to send back the unused portion at my own expense and they still charged me, so I had to cancel my debit card and get one with a new account number. I’ve found that most, if not all, weight loss products are bogus and do not work. For the past year plus, I’ve realized the only way to lose weight is to exercise more and practice portion control. When a product advertises you can lose 30 lbs. in 30 days, beware! Like that old saying, “If it seems too good to be true, it doesn’t work!” Thanks much for posting this, along with your comments about skin creams to trim fat. If people only gave these products a thought, they’d realize they don’t work.

  2. Dljc
    Reply

    I tried sensa and still have a bunch of it. Id like to get a refund. I must admit that I think it reduced my appetite but it also gave me stomach cramps so i discontinued use.

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