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Celebrex Side Effects & Interactions Are Scary

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If you watch television you have probably seen the current Celebrex commercial. It starts with a picture book of a woman sitting in a lounge chair at the beach waving to friends. The pages flip quickly as the voice-over says, "It's simple physics. A body at rest tends to stay at rest while a body in motion tends to stay in motion. Staying active can actually ease arthritis symptoms."

It's a compelling message and the attractive middle-aged woman is seen moving from the chair to water's edge and then into the water. As she swims out to join her friends in an idyllic setting, the pages flip faster until you see her swimming full frame. There's a boat and a beautiful dog that jumps off the boat and swims out to meet her. Everyone is having a fabulous time and the message seems to be that Celebrex will provide 24-hour relief from pain and inflammation so that you too could be moving easier, as active and happy as this woman.

Just as the woman throws the ball to the gorgeous yellow Labrador retriever, the announcer starts sharing the following scary side effects:

"All prescription NSAIDs like Celebrex, ibuprofen, naproxen and meloxicam have the same cardiovascular warning. They all may increase the chance of heart attack or stroke, which can lead to death. This chance increases if you have heart disease or risk factors such as high blood pressure or when NSAIDs are taken for long periods. NSAIDs like Celebrex increase the chance of serious skin or allergic reactions or stomach and intestine problems such as bleeding and ulcers, which can occur without warning and may cause death.

"Patients also taking aspirin and the elderly are at increased risk for stomach bleeding and ulcers. Don't take Celebrex if you have bleeding in the stomach or intestines or had an asthma attack, hives, other allergies to aspirin, NSAIDs or sulfonamides. Get help right away if you have swelling of the face or throat or trouble breathing."

While this complicated message is rapidly being delivered, the woman and her companions are swimming, playing with the dog, smiling and generally having a wonderful time.

We suspect that beautiful images tend to counteract worrisome messages. How can you take a warning that says "may increase the chance of heart attack or stroke which can lead to death" seriously when a dog is swimming towards you to retrieve a tennis ball and the woman is smiling? You are told that serious skin or stomach problems "can occur without warning and may cause death."

Such complications are more likely to affect the very people who are targets of the commercial, the elderly and people with arthritis. These are individuals who are also more likely to have heart disease and high blood pressure, the very risk factors that make them vulnerable to a fatal drug reaction. People with arthritis don't just have pain and inflammation for a few days or weeks. This is a chronic condition, so the warning that heart attack or stroke are more likely if drugs like Celebrex (NSAIDs) are "taken for long periods of time" seems inadequate. The very people who are likely to take such drugs for long periods of time are then put at greater risk for a deadly drug reaction.

It turns out that Celebrex is related to the arthritis drug Vioxx that was removed from the market because it led to thousands of heart attacks. The makers of Celebrex are being very transparent and telling people up front that this is a real risk. We wonder, though, whether viewers are paying careful attention.

Airing such a commercial over and over costs tens of millions of dollars. It must be paying off. According to industry insiders, Celebrex took in nearly $2 billion last year, making it one of Pfizer's biggest sellers.

CELEBREX (CELECOXIB) SIDE EFFECTS:

  • Digestive upset, abdominal pain, heartburn, diarrhea, nausea, gas, constipation, reflux, gastritis,
  • Headache, dizziness, vertigo, back pain
  • Sore throat, runny nose, sinusitis, upper respiratory tract infection
  • Skin rash (this is a serious symptoms and must be reported to a doctor immediately!)
  • Irregular heart rhythms, palpitations
  • High blood pressure, chest pain (angina)
  • Fluid retention, swelling of hands or feet
  • Hearing difficulties, tinnitus (ringing in the ears)
  • Liver or kidney function changes (abnormal lab results), kidney damage, liver damage
  • Sensitivity to sunlight (sunburn)
  • Ulcers, bleeding ulcers, perforated ulcers (a potentially life-threatening complication)
  • Heart attack, stroke
  • Congestive heart failure
  • Allergic reaction, difficulty breathing
  • Blood disorders, blood clots, pulmonary embolism, anemia

 

DRUG INTERACTIONS WITH CELEBREX:

No one should ever take any other medications with Celebrex without double-checking with the prescriber and the pharmacist.

Here are just a few drugs that may cause complications when combined with Celebrex:

  • Aspirin and other NSAIDs (such as diclofenac, ibuprofen, naproxen)
  • Anticoagulants (such as warfarin, known by the brand name Coumadin)
  • Lithium
  • Blood pressure drugs such as ACE inhibitors or ARBs
  • Fluconazole
  • Furosomide (Lasix)
  • Methotrexate

As appealing as the Celebrex commercials may be, we think that NSAIDs should be reserved as a last resort for pain and inflammation and should be used intermittently rather than daily. Here are some natural approaches for controlling pain and inflammation:

  • Turmeric (curcumin)
  • Tart cherry juice or cherry concentrate
  • Pomegranate juice
  • Almonds

  • Olive oil

  • Walnuts

  • Blueberries

  • Salmon
• Bluefish

  • Ginger

  • Vitamin D

  • Gin-soaked raisins
  • Certo & grape juice

  • Apple cider vinegar, apple & grape juice

  • Boswellia

  • Fish oil & green-lipped mussels

  • Acupuncture

 

To learn more about how to use such foods and remedies we offer our People's Pharmacy Quick & Handy Home Remedies. You can also learn more in our Guide to Alternatives for Arthritis. You might also like to take advantage of a special offer. Buy The People's Pharmacy Quick & Handy Home Remedies and get 50% off Recipes & Remedies from The People's Pharmacy with lots of delicious suggestions for anti-inflammatory meals.

Please share your own experience with arthritis remedies below. How have such approaches worked for you? Has Celebrex or other NSAIDs been helpful without causing side effects? Share your own story in the comment section.

Here are just a few reader reactions:

"I have used Vioxx in the past and currently use Celebrex occasionally. I also suffered a heart attack. Was it a result of taking these drugs? I don't know but all drugs I see advertised carry a similar if not identical warning. Some are even more ominous.

"My conclusion is that anyone can have a adverse reaction to any drug but the majority will not and the manufacturers are simply trying to avoid lawsuits by giving these warnings which put the onus on the users to prove they were not aware of the possibility of any adverse reaction even if it had nothing at all to do with the drug." P. M.


"Just endorsed my belief that these drugs that they are touting as the next best thing since sliced white bread (also not good for you) are crazy.

"Have you heard the caveats that come with most of the drugs that are on the market? To me the side effects are worse than the symptoms of the diseases and some of the diseases are bad enough. I am going as natural as possible and really don't think that I will be any worse off than if I take the drugs.

"I think that the worst ones are the ones that seem to compromise your immune system or that say they can cause cancer. Really? I want that in my system WHY?" Bobbie


"Yes, this ad is pretty amazing. If you die after taking Celebrex I guess they can say to the family, 'we warned you.'

"Another ad running concurrently is for Nexium, telling us that our doctor is the expert and to listen to the doctor. Of course, the only thing the doctor 'knows' about reflux is what the drug rep has told him/her. I am the expert on MY body, and although there are times when my doctor has helped a lot, he is not infallible." D.S.


"My thought is that many people ignore the risks because they believe them to be very rare. These types of warnings should come with the likelihood of adverse effects to allow the user to make an informed choice." Modena


"My older sister took Celebrex for awhile and went into total liver failure. She turned yellow and swelled up. The doctors in the hospital finally figured out it was the Celebrex and stopped it. She did recover eventually but liver failure is another side effect." R.D.W.

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8 Comments

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I was switched to Celebrex when Vioxx was taken off the market.

Also not mentioned in the warning is that it can be "addictive," almost impossible to stop. I belong to an online support group of hundreds of people trying to wean off Celebrex. I have never experienced any of the dire side affects but I would like to stop taking it before I do.

I have Post-polio Syndrome [PPS], and know a lot of other people who also have it. Over the years, many of them have suddenly dropped dead from a massive coronary. They were all taking Celebrex or Vioxx. I have never taken either of them for the nerve and muscle pain from PPS. I can 'live' without them.

I was on Celebrex and other NSAIDs for many years, possibly 20. I also took Zantac routinely to counteract the heartburn.

I have ended up with atrial fibrillation. I recently had a TIA [transient ischemic attack or mini-stroke] at which time the doctors put me on blood thinners.

It took two weeks to overcome the withdrawal from the Celebrex. Now I'm off all NSAIDs and no longer need any antacids. However, I'm having a lot of pain with arthritis.

We mute the TV for all pharmaceutical drug dealer commercials, in our home. As a rule of thumb, as consumers, we should demand to know why is it that we spend so much money for health care in America but have such poor health outcomes?

The financial conflicts of interest in our system should have us all outraged. The focus on selling drugs that do so much harm is shameful.

I know all those interactions can happen and by law they must tell you all that. But I find they scare a lot of people away from using these drugs that help. I have taken celebrex on and off for about 12 years and have never had any problem with it. I am on it pretty steady for the last 6 months because of severe arthritis. Both hips & knees were replaced because of the arthritis. Celebrex has been the only thing that helps relieve my pain and inflammation. Just be aware of the problems that could occur.

In addition to natural anti-inflammatory foods, etc., which certainly help, you didn't mention foods to avoid. I used to have horrible knee pain and used some of the suggestions on this website. I then gave up the nightshade family (tomatoes, eggplant, peppers & white potatoes) and my symptoms disappeared. I play tennis and dance regularly without pain or the need to use other measures to control the pain.

I was prescribed Fosomax without the doctor consulting me and discussing the side effects. He merely mailed me a copy of a lab report that said I was borderline for osteoarthritis. I received the drug in the mail and read the potential side effects which are terrifying. What kind of medicine are doctors practicing these days?

You know there is a middle ground between dangerous doses and none-at-all.
"A lot of pain" is a major problem and perhaps you can find a balance of risk/benefit.

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