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Vitamin D and Heart Disease

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Previous studies have hinted that low levels of vitamin D in the body may be associated with a higher risk of heart disease. A ten-year study from Seattle suggests, however, that this connection does not hold true in all ethnic groups.

More than 6,000 participants in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis had blood levels of 25-hydroxy vitamin D measured at the beginning of a decade of follow-up. The scientists found a significant link between low vitamin D levels and subsequent heart disease among Chinese and white study subjects, but there was no clear association between vitamin D and heart disease in Hispanic or African-American volunteers.

Studies that are currently underway (including the VITAL study out of Harvard) will hopefully tell us more about the relationship between vitamin D and heart disease in various ethnic populations. In the meantime, we offer information on vitamin D and its association with a wide range of health concerns in our Guide to Vitamin D Deficiency.

[JAMA, July 10, 2013]

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From the link provided: VITAL is a research study in 20,000 men and women across the U.S. investigating whether taking daily dietary supplements of vitamin D3 (2000 IU) or omega-3 fatty acids (Omacor® fish oil, 1 gram) reduces the risk for developing cancer, heart disease, and stroke in people who do not have a prior history of these illnesses.

I am a Caucasian woman living in the American south, and I need to take 5000 IU of D3 to keep my blood level above 50. In the winter, I take 7000 IU / day.

My understanding is that African Americans get even less from the sun, and therefore would need more supplements.

>Brigham and Women’s Hospital, an affiliate of Harvard Medical School, in Boston, Massachusetts.

It is not possible to get enough Vitamin D from the sun in Boston.

Therefore: This study appears to be designed to prove that if you don't give enough of a supplement to make a difference, it won't make a difference.

Would hate to be an African-American woman in this study.

Therefore: This study appears to be designed to prove that if you don't give enough of a supplement to make a difference, it won't make a difference.

WELL SAID! Common sense won't get you the big bucks, more's the pity.

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