Q. I used to get skin tags removed by my doctor. Then my insurance stopped covering it, as they classified the problem as cosmetic. The collars on the shirts I am required to wear to work were irritating my skin tags, but that’s the insurance company for you.
I’m going to try liquid bandage, since I saw on your website it might work. I’ll see if this does the trick.

A. We learned about this remedy from readers of this column. One wrote: “This is a note of thanks and appreciation. Several years ago I cut out your column regarding applying liquid bandage twice a day to make skin tags disappear. I never tried it until recently.
“One skin tag kept getting caught in my necklace. I remembered your article and bought the drugstore brand of liquid bandage. To my delight, within a week of applying it twice a day, the skin tag was gone. I’ve since tried this remedy on additional skin tags on my neck and once again, they have also gone. I can’t thank you enough.”

Skin tags are benign fleshy growths that frequently appear where the skin folds, such as the armpit, neck or groin. They are not dangerous, but they can be annoying. Dermatologists can remove them surgically, but that could become costly if insurance won’t pay.
Although home remedies are rarely tested in a scientific manner, readers of this column have reported success with a variety of treatments. You can read about other approaches at PeoplesPharmacy.com.

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  1. K.M.
    Reply

    I *think* you apply it over top. I tried the liquid bandage a couple of years ago (but I got lazy about applying it) and if I recall correctly, it sort of flakes off a little from day to day. I think the idea is that you smother the skin tag so I presume you just continue to apply the liquid bandage. If it’s in a visible location, you might want to remove and reapply for a “cleaner” look.

  2. Melissa
    Reply

    When using liquid bandage to remove moles and skin tags… People say to apply a coat twice a day or so, do you apply it over the initial coat or do you peel off each layer before applying a new coat of the liquid bandage?

  3. Renee
    Reply

    I developed a skin tag about 6 months ago. It wasn’t a bother until last week. One day I woke up and it was a bit painful and seemed a little swollen. I checked out this site and read about the C-herb. I looked up what C-herb was and thought I’d buy some and try it out. However, in my medicine drawer was a tube of zinc ointment. I’ve used it on acne pimples on my face for years with great success. I thought I’d give it a try. I put a band-aid on top.
    The next day, the skin tag was shriveled up and had a bit of dark red almost black cast on top as if from a dried scab. The second day of applying the zinc ointment and it seemed to almost have disappeared. The third day and I have trouble finding where it was. It was on my side under my under arm area and easy to feel, but now that it’s gone, I have to search for a little discolored spot.

  4. fbl
    Reply

    C-Herb is a paste of different herbs supposedly from an ancient North American Indian Medicine formula that is used externally and internally to get rid of abnormal tissue. Black Salve is the same type of thing but much harsher and leaves more scar tissue. It does, I tried it once.
    My family Dr. said to stick with the C-Herb as it does the job, but more gently. One puts the salve on a “spot” daily and covers with a bandaid. Only four days are needed and a white ring will appear around the spot. A cream is used to dress the spot and eventually a plug of tissue will fall out. If it has a “tail” then one leaves it alone until the whole thing falls out.
    A healing cream is applied daily until the hole fills in. If the spot is large then a C-4 cream is used first to shrink it down to a workable size.
    I have used the stuff for many years on moles and other skin spots. It is gentler than surgical removal by a Dr. and leaves less of a scar.

  5. FDS
    Reply

    Trying liquid bandage on skin tags. They appear to get worse; that is, they get whitish and bigger. Is this normal? How long does it take for them to drop off?
    My husband said he used hydrogen peroxide on his and it worked. I’m using both to see if they work.

  6. ss
    Reply

    What is C-Herb???

  7. ss
    Reply

    Not in the area I have to get to, but thanks anyway…Any other ideas? Will duct tape work?

  8. OB
    Reply

    Years ago, my general practitioner told me to have my husband tie a thread tightly around my skin tags. In a matter of only a few days, they dropped off with no discomfort at all. Very effective.
    The only problem is now I have no one to tie them off. However I recommend everyone try this.

  9. ss
    Reply

    I used liquid bandage, but it was on the bikini line in a sensitive area it hurt so bad and I feel nail polish will do the same. Any other ideas?
    thanks

  10. gs
    Reply

    I use colorless nail polish for skin tags – apply once daily – you will see them disappear in a short while.

  11. db
    Reply

    Years ago I asked my doctor about a skin tag (I didn’t even know what it was then) and what I should do about it.
    He told me to have someone tie a thread around it very tightly which I did…it was a bit uncomfortable procedure but it soon disappeared. Simple, no cost, and it worked.

  12. fbl
    Reply

    C-herb also works well. Skin tags and all kinds of abnormal skin things. Moles etc.

  13. Shari
    Reply

    I’ve tried this method, but the smell of the Liquid Bandage is so awful, I couldn’t keep up the treatments. I could smell this all day long and I know others around me could too. UGH.

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