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Sugar Dressing for Stubborn Wound

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Q. I have an old chemical burn on my shin that re-opened. The wound cultured positive for MRSA, so I took antibiotics for a month. Despite that, the wound continued to get worse and nothing seemed to help. I tried several prescription wound gels like Silvadene and Bactroban to no avail.

I found your article about sugar for wounds and have been using it for several days. The wound is healing nicely now. Thank you.

A. According to orthopedic surgeon Richard Knutson, MD, a mixture of three parts confectioners' sugar to one part cooking oil can be used to make a dressing that speeds wound healing. He has treated about 7,000 patients over three decades with good results.

More details and an interview with Dr. Knutson can be found at PeoplesPharmacy.com. He first published his research on this approach to healing in November, 1981, in the Southern Medical Journal. He has continued to refine the treatment since then, and it is simple enough to use at home.

One reader has commented: "This is well known to me, and works great. My ex-wife who is a physician and now works here in the USA had been using the technique for years. She initially learned about it during her residency in Argentina (around 1981-82). She had to care for many old patients with ulcers or wounds that would not heal, and this was the least expensive and most effective way to treat them. I have also heard about combining sugar with lemon juice (sounds painful). But just white bleached sugar works very well.

"She probably believed in this because her training involved day by day contact with patients, doing chores that are now usually performed by nurses in the USA. She actually changed the wounds' dressing, touched, palpated, probed, listened to the hearts and lungs and performed intensive hands-on examinations of real suffering people. She also learned some compassion for the patients in the process. All that is gone from medical schools in the USA where patients have been replaced by crash dummies with electronics for training future doctors (this is true).... but I digress!!!"

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8 Comments

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This is a good one. A man I worked with and I were discussing our children's health problems. He said, As an infant his child had a protruding intestine. Doctors, specialist were supposedly trying to figure out what to do with no success... Then one day a new nurse walked in. She went out to the coffee station picked up a pack of granulated sugar came back and poured the sugar right on the protruding intestine at which point the intestine retreated back inside the child's body.

The child healed and all was well. I have always commented, "Wonder why this nurse wasn't fired for having common sense". I get angry every time I think of this. I have seem a lot. I am a miracle of survivability from an auto wreck. My daughter had leukemia (AML). Survives today after BMT now 22yrs later.

Our/Your health is detrimental to, "You being your own best advocate, doing your own research". The medical profession is victim of the industrial complex. Your health is a low priority for these monsters. "SO", Save yourself with your own research. They will not. To them we are guinea pigs. This is why I keep up with Joe and Terry. They pass on good info for all to share. Keep me posted.

Glad to be reminded of sugar treatment for slow healing wounds.
And it is true compassion as well as integrity is rare in American medical schools or in American medicine. That is why US is not highly rated for medical treatment despite we spend far more money on medical treatment than any other nation.
I live in Houston, TX were the medical center is the biggest in the world but it is far from the best primarily because of greed.

Here medical consumers have to practice self protection from doctors too eager to operate or prescribe expensive and often dangerous or unnecessary drugs.

Medical consumers beware!

Barbara

Turmeric works also.

I would like to hear more about this sure---sounds wonderful.

Thanks for posting this. I have a question about measurements. When referring to three parts to one part, are we talking about volume or weight? Three grams of sugar to one gram of oil may be different ratio than 3 tsp sugar to 1 tsp oil? When I first moved to a country that used metrics I learned that volume and weight are not interchangeable. I made many a failed recipe...
One cup of flour is not 250 gms.

PEOPLE'S PHARMACY RESPONSE: When we made it, we used volume measurements and it worked.

what type of cooking oil?

It does not matter what kind of oil you use. I personally use sesame oil which is antibacterial, like coconut oil. Google both to find out about their respective qualities.

Very happy to come across this post, as I am searching fervently for an answer for my teen child.

Will this protocol work for a stubborn wound following pilonidal cystectomy? Child had surgical removal of cyst nearly 12 months ago, resulting in 2" high, 1.5" deep, 1" wide wound just below the top of the natal cleft, in the midline.

It took nearly 3 months to close, then reopened for 6 weeks, closed for 2 weeks, reopened for 11 weeks, closed for 2, and has been opened for the past 5 months. The opening is small -- WAY smaller than post-surgical wound, about the size of a small pea. We've tried Manuka honey for about 3 months, but it just won't close. There is no obvious infection, no pus, just normal mild exudate.

Could the sugar/oil wound dressing be used safely for a wound in this location (meaning little air, inherently moister area, persistent friction - all leading to a difficult healing situation in the first place)?

Thank you for your input. We realize any information provided does not replace medical advice from our doctor. We're just hopeful for a solution, as child leaves for college soon...

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