Aspirin may be one of the most cost effective ways to prevent cancer. For more than two decades scientists have seen evidence that aspirin might help reduce the risk of certain cancers. Three new studies have just reinforced that conclusion. One analysis involved more than 50 clinical trials designed to determine if aspirin could prevent heart attacks and strokes. Nearly 80,000 subjects were included, and those assigned to take aspirin had 15 percent fewer deaths from cancer. They also experienced protection from heart attacks and strokes.
Another analysis covered 17,000 participants taking 75 mg of aspirin in randomized controlled trials. In this group of people, aspirin reduced the risk of metastasis by about 36 percent. This inexpensive drug appears to offer protection against cancers of the esophagus, breast, lung and stomach as well as against colon cancer. The scientists also found that, although aspirin can increase the risk of internal bleeding, this danger tends to fade with time and does not outweigh the cancer-protection benefit.
[The Lancet; The Lancet Oncology, online March 20, 2012]

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  1. Karen
    Reply

    What what I’ve read, it’s only aspirin that has been found to have the anti-cancer property. (Of course, it’s going to be pretty hard to get anyone to pay for a double-blind testing low-dose aspirin against vitamin I, as it’s called in our house.)
    Take a baby aspirin a day. Cheap if you buy the generics. Helps with aches and pains, too, as I discovered when I had to stop it before and after my colonoscopy. (Which was clear, perhaps due to the aspirin habit.)
    The longer you take the aspirin, the more benefit you get.
    (I am not a stockholder in any pharma company.)

  2. kee
    Reply

    Does this include all nsaids or just aspirin?

  3. Karen
    Reply

    >the natural choice versus the chemical that’s pushed by the pharmaceutical companies.
    Of all the drugs on the market today, I think plain old aspirin is as close to “natural” as any D3 pill you can buy. The essence of aspirin has been used for millenia, in the form of willow bark. The evidence I’ve read suggests strongly that both supplements help, in different forms. Daily baby aspirin, and (reasonably) high dose D3, both do something, as-yet unknown, to help prevent a number of cancers.
    >an aspirin is like a breath of fresh air compared to chemo and the host of other available treatments out there.
    Please note that aspirin is reported to PREVENT cancer, not to treat it after you have it. Don’t do a Steve Jobs and let yourself die by being overly “natural” once you have been diagnosed. I do what I can to prevent, but should I be diagnosed with the real thing, I’m heading straight for the big guns, even if I maintain my supportive supplements on the side.

  4. jn
    Reply

    Thanks for the info. When you have cancer, anything as simple as taking
    an aspirin is like a breath of fresh air compared to chemo and the host of other available treatments out there.

  5. HN
    Reply

    So if you do get these certain cancers, does it mean that you had an “aspirin deficiency”?? I doubt it! With all the recent research on boosting the immune system to possibly prevent cancer with vitamin D3, I think I’ll go with the natural choice versus the chemical that’s pushed by the pharmaceutical companies.

  6. Karen
    Reply

    >The scientists also found that, although aspirin can increase the risk of internal bleeding, this danger tends to fade with time and does not outweigh the cancer-protection benefit.
    Please say more about this.
    The danger of bleeding is high on initial doses, but our bodies adjust to the anti-coagulent effect if we take aspirin, esp. low dose, on a regular basis? If true, why are doctors concerned that we stop aspirin before elective procedures?
    That doesn’t jibe with what I know about NSAIDs and ulcers, or is that a different side effect?

  7. Paul43
    Reply

    I would like to hear more about this.

  8. Jesse
    Reply

    But what about the recent European study published in Opthomology journal stating aspirin causes age related macular degeneration to become the severe wet form that leads to blindness????

  9. clh
    Reply

    I’ve heard in the past about benefits of taking an aspirin daily for a number of preventative measures – cancer? exciting! On a general level, what would you recommend as a dosage? thank you…
    PEOPLE’S PHARMACY RESPONSE: Here’s a recent show on cancer prevention with aspirin: http://www.peoplespharmacy.com/2012/02/04/845-aspirin-secrets-revealed/

  10. DS
    Reply

    What dose of aspirin is effective? Does this hold true for women as well as for men? I would like to hear more.

  11. Debbie A. L.
    Reply

    How much aspirin is recommended daily?

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