Q. I read your response to a reader with blepharitis who suggested T/Gel was helpful. You mentioned there is no study of this treatment.
While I can’t offer any scientific study, I can offer another data point for the method. My physician diagnosed blepharitis and recommended applying T/Gel in the shower every night.
It has not only been 100 percent effective in treating the problem, but also efficient. I have used only 40 percent of the 4.4 oz bottle during four years of treatment.

A. Blepharitis is a medical term for inflammation of the eyelid. Symptoms may include itching, redness, flaking and crusting on the edge of the eyelid.
You are not the only one to find dandruff shampoo helpful. We recently heard from another reader: “Not only does Selsun Blue shampoo control my blepharitis, it’s the only thing that works. I apply the foam to the eyelids for about 15 seconds each shower to knock out the itching and redness.
“I tried prescription medication from my doctor and it made my lids gooey and clouded my vision. I have to use the shampoo on a regular basis or the blepharitis comes back, but it does work.”
Dandruff shampoos have antifungal activity, which may explain why they work. Be sure to keep all shampoo out of the eyes!

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  1. Linda
    Reply

    What is T/Gel?

  2. Patty
    Reply

    Really appreciate Dany’s post about skin pH and blepharitis. What you say makes good sense and it hadn’t occurred to me.
    I did a little reading, and apparently our skin can be too alkaline OR too acid, and should be handled accordingly. I suspect mine is too alkaline, so not sure I should use baking soda, which I know is alkaline. I’m trying out using diluted apple cider vinegar, which is said to restore the correct skin pH. But the proof will be in the results.
    To me, this is a pretty serious issue, and it’s frustrating that the medical community seems to have nothing useful to offer except that we should plan to live with it for the rest of our lives.
    All the best to you too, Dany, and everybody reading this. I second that: don’t give up, stay positive, persevere.
    Patty

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