Fish oil has a reputation for helping the heart. Not only has it been linked to lower levels of triglycerides and less inflammation, it has also been shown to reduce the risk of atrial fibrillation after heart surgery. A new study, however, found that fish oil was no more effective against atrial fib than placebo. This was a disappointment but demonstrates the need for large, randomized controlled trials to determine it such alternative therapies are truly helpful.
[Annual Meeting of the American Heart Association, Nov. 15, 2010]

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  1. a.s.
    Reply

    I had a stent installed 6 yrs ago. Since then, among other things I take 3600mg fish oil, 1800mg RYR, 1500mg niacin, and 45-60 min relatively vigorous exercise five days a week. Passed all my stress echo-cardiograms ever since, & my doc couldn’t be happier. Me, neither!

  2. CTC
    Reply

    I was diagnosed with Atrial Fibrillation last Nov. 2009. I always took Fish oil. Now I’m coumidin only. The doctor said that it is alright for me to take fish oil. If it isn’t going to help in anyway, then shall I continue taking it?
    I also have a thyroid condition, Hypo. And I am on a very low dosage of Lipitor.
    One doctor in the hospital told me that the AF came from my thyroid, then I read that it can also come from cholesterol problem. Now I’m really confused. I’m 82 yrs. old.
    Connie

  3. R. H. A.
    Reply

    How much fish oil was used? It may have been an inadequate amount to be effective. It would also be helpful to know who funded the study. There seems to be a predisposition on the part of many researchers to find that supplements are either harmful or valueless.
    Some such research may not be objective. Many prescription drug dollars are at risk when non-patentable substances are found to be helpful. It seems to me that in the current media if anything negative is considered to be a result of a supplement, it gets huge attention; however the negative effects of many prescription medicines are very often under-reported or viewed as acceptable risks.

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