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Will Fruit Juice Interfere with Pill?

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Q. I take felodipine for high blood pressure. I know I can't take it with grapefruit juice. I recently read that orange and apple juice may also affect medications.

Is there a fruit juice I could use for taking my felodipine? How about pineapple juice? It's getting so you just don't know what is safe to eat or drink.

A. Drug-food interactions are incredibly complicated. Grapefruit juice increases blood levels of nearly 50 medications including felodipine. Apple and orange juice have the opposite effect for certain drugs. This might reduce effectiveness for medicines like the antihistamine fexofenadine (Allegra) or antibiotics such as ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin.
We could find no evidence that pineapple juice interacts with felodipine, but it can affect dozens of other drugs, including pain relievers and antidepressants.

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Two quick follow-up questions:

1. Can you speak to interactions with tomato or V-8 juice?

2. If it's not advisable to take medicines with fruit juice, what period of time should separate taking medicines and drinking juice, either before or after the medicine?

Does anyone know if Welch's grape juice interferes with any medication absorption?

This question seems to be about what fruit juices can be used for taking drugs. But surely some fruit juice/drug interaction problems occur even if they are not taken together.

I found a very informative book that lists over 18,000 drug-herb-vitamin interactions. I have found the book to be very helpful. It helped me find out that green tea would interact with a muscle relaxant drug that I had to take so I took the medicine with plain tap water. Prior to reading the book I would not have thought that the seemingly innocuous green tea would cause a reduction in the efficacy of the muscle relaxant. The drug information sheet from the pharmacy did not list green tea as interacting with the muscle relaxant. The title of the book is 'A-Z Guide To Drug-Herb-Vitamin Interactions Revised and Expanded 2nd Edition' edited by Alan Gaby, MD, Forrest Batz, Pharm.D., George Constantine, R.Ph, PH.D. and the Healthnotes Medical Team. You can purchase the book through Amazon. I assure you that I don't get a commission from the sale of the book.

This is easily fixed! I have always been told to take meds with water! I have never been told why tho! So take your meds with water!

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