Hundreds of millions of eggs have been recalled because of salmonella contamination. Before the recall, thousands of people had suffered with fever, diarrhea, and abdominal pain caused by this infection. Many of them will be disappointed to learn they might have been spared if farmers had given their chickens a low-cost vaccine. The widespread use of such vaccines in Great Britain has resulted in very low rates of salmonella in British eggs. Not all poultry scientists are convinced this is the solution to the problem, but some American egg producers who have adopted the vaccine report good results. Good hygiene in the hen houses is also critical for keeping chickens and their eggs free of infection.

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  1. keith
    Reply

    Well I am suffering from salmonella at the moment and looking for natural remedies, this page has no good info although fasting- drinking only garlic and peppermint tea along with low sugar content juices, water and gator aide keeps coming up on other sites. However there doesn’t seem to be a silver bullet, they pretty much all say you have to wait it out.

  2. Sue
    Reply

    Personally, I believe that the fewer drugs, shots, etc. applied to any of our food sources, the better. I don’t see why a vaccine is necessary for chickens if they are raised and cared for properly.
    We eat free-range eggs, sometimes organic, sometimes not, from grain-fed (not animal byproduct-fed, which I’ve heard is higher risk for salmonella contamination) chickens which are not given hormones, growth accelerants or any other unnatural substances.
    These eggs, I’ve noticed, have much thicker shells than standard commercial eggs. I have been told by people formerly involved in the chicken/egg industry that thicker shells can resist salmonella contamination better than thinner, more porous shells – although the shells can still have germs on the outside. Regardless of whether what I’ve heard is accurate, I cook my eggs thoroughly and wash my hands immediately after handling them, broken or not.
    Improperly handled eggs have been linked with salmonella for years; my mother taught me about the risks and how to handle them when I was a teenager. No one in my family has ever had a problem.

  3. cpmt
    Reply

    I have a question. Can we wash the eggs before using them in a solution of water and bleach to be in the safe side?
    PEOPLE’S PHARMACY RESPONSE: EGGS COULD CERTAINLY BE WASHED, WITH CARE. BUT THAT WON’T ELIMINATE THE RISK OF SALMONELLA. IN MANY CASES, THE HEN IS INFECTED AND THE GERM GETS INTO THE EGG WHILE IT IS FORMING INSIDE HER. THE BEST DEFENSE IS TO COOK THE EGGS THOROUGHLY, THOUGH CERTAINLY ALL YOUR BEST KITCHEN HYGIENE PRACTICES ARE ALSO IMPORTANT.

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