Q. You have discussed ways to control blood pressure but not the one I use. I have found eating celery and using celery seeds on my food reduces my blood pressure in minutes.
A. Celery and celery seeds have been used for many different problems, including gout, sore joints, headache and loss of appetite. No scientific studies show whether others would get the same blood-pressure-lowering benefit you do.
There is strong scientific evidence for the DASH diet, which is rich in vegetables and fruits and low in salt, fats, sweets and meat. Following such a diet can reduce blood pressure over time.

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  1. RES
    Reply

    All this business on “how to lose weight” really makes me laugh——–exercise——–eat less——-etc etc etc
    did you ever notice that when you are sick with the flu or something that decreases your appetite——and you are sick for more than a week——–
    guess what?????? you suddenly find yourself 10 pounds lighter———-and all you did was not eat——–so I guess the answer to losing weight just might be to —eat less!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  2. Herman the frog
    Reply

    Why do the doctors not tell their patients about this? It is because they are ignorant about nutirtion.

  3. John
    Reply

    The general rule with celery is four to five stalks a day to have a measurable impact on your blood pressure. It has something like three times as much potassium as it does sodium so you don’t generally have to worry about the sodium content in it. I’ve known people that have had a significant decrease in blood pressure by eating celery and/or drinking celery juice. One older woman that goes to the same doctor as I do actually did well enough eating celery that she no longer needed to take blood pressure medication.

  4. cpmt
    Reply

    I know this post is old but I just found it and I am curious.
    I read somewhere that celery is high in nitrates, will this cause damage or will be bad if we eat a lot (I am thinking like the nitrate in lunch meat …) or it is different ?
    sorry if I ask a stupid question but I don’t know much about this.

  5. Melanie
    Reply

    Isn’t there a lot of sodium in celery?
    PEOPLE’S PHARMACY RESPONSE: THERE ARE ABOUT 100 MG OF SODIUM IN TWO STALKS OF CELERY. IT HAS EVEN MORE POTASSIUM, SO THAT MAY COUNTERACT THE SODIUM.

  6. Suzanne B.
    Reply

    My best friend concurs with the person who wrote the question. She just told me a couple of weeks ago she is controlling her blood pressure by eating celery. She no longer takes medication because the celery is working. I think she makes broth and drinks it.

  7. alfreda
    Reply

    I agree that DASH diet plans do work and it’s something we should be doing any way. My blood pressure was up 188/98 on 09-07-09 and it is down now at 138/77 (today)09-15-09. Just pray and ask God to help you change your eating habits and exercise. I think very body can do it if that put their mind to it, I did.

  8. EAO
    Reply

    I agree that the DASH diet is healthy, and I personally love fruits, vegetables, grains, nuts and fatty fish, so that it is easy for me to eat a diet similar to that. However, I do not agree that most Americans believe that such a diet can make that big a difference–and a shocking number of people I am in contact with don’t even KNOW it.
    So although it is “old news” for me, I think it hasn’t even entered the consciousness of many people. I would guess that even some of the readers of Peoples’ Pharmacy, who are certainly more knowledgeable and sophisticated than most Americans, do not yet know this. So I doubt that Peoples’ Pharmacy is just “preaching to the choir.” This is a message that is worth repeating over and over.
    I also agree that it would take a drastic lifestyle change and most people find even small lifestyle changes daunting. I would like to hear some more suggestions as to how to achieve such lifestyle changes.
    PEOPLE’S PHARMACY RESPONSE: FOCUSING ON MAKING ONE SMALL CHANGE AT A TIME MAY WORK. YOU ARE RIGHT THAT MAKING BIG CHANGES (ESPECIALLY WHEN THEY ARE STATED IN GENERAL TERMS, SUCH AS EAT LESS AND EXERCISE MORE) IS DIFFICULT.

  9. R.ES.
    Reply

    I agree with RMD. My husband and I travel all over the U.S. He works temporarily in different areas, and I am continually SHOCKED at the “Morbidly Obese” people, especially in the Northwest, and the Midwest.
    I’m talking about young people weighing over 300 lbs or more. THERE IS NO MAGIC FORMULA. It is calories in, and calories out, just like a piece of machinery.
    Eat less, work off the calories, and guess what? You’ll lose weight and have lower blood pressure, lower blood sugar, etc. etc. etc. IT’S NOT ROCKET SCIENCE!

  10. RMD
    Reply

    DUH I can’t believe the statement, “There is strong scientific evidence for the DASH diet, which is rich in vegetables and fruits and low in salt, fats, sweets and meat. Following such a diet can reduce blood pressure over time.” Talk about old news!
    Unless your readers live on Mars, they must know that a diet rich in vegetables and fruits and low in salt, fats, sweets and meat are good for their overall well being. This is very old news, please try to tell us something we don’t already know. The DASH diet requires a total readjustment of the American diet which most people are not willing to do. If Americans developed this diet as their normal everyday diet and exercised regularly, they would not be overweight and would be healthier, but it takes a drastic change in lifestyle to do this and most Americans regardless of what they say are not willing to to do this.
    Instead we continue to remain overweight and out of shape and we look for the next new fad diet or miracle cure such as celery and celery seeds. Good Luck!

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