Most of us are familiar with anxiety and stress. Who wouldn’t feel nervous after getting a letter from the Internal Revenue Service requesting an audit of last year’s tax return? Or imagine yourself driving on a lonely road late at night, developing a flat tire, and realizing that your jack is broken. Even self-confident people frequently discover that giving a speech or performing in front of a large audience can make the heart start to pound, put butterflies in the gut, and the turn hands to ice.

People deal with stress differently. Some find that talking out their problems is the best medicine. For them, having a shoulder to cry on can be very helpful. Others have a hard time revealing their feelings and fears. Men, in particular, may worry that disclosing anxieties could be perceived as a sign of weakness. They may prefer to exercise–the wood chopping technique of tension reduction. It’s hard to remain uptight after a long swim, a hard run or a vigorous workout.

Imagine yourself in a traffic jam after a particularly hard day at work. The longer you sit the hotter the engine gets. As you watch the temperature gauge climb your anxiety level goes up accordingly. Now picture yourself lying on a beach with warm sun, gentle breezes and peaceful waves. No stress there.

You can’t take a vacation every time things get tense, but you can learn to relax. We can’t think of any better way to achieve a state of relaxation than by listening to or watching one of Dr. Emmett Miller’s CDs or DVDs. Emmett has been transporting people to relaxing internal environments for over 20 years. This physician has one of the most soothing voices we have ever heard. Our all-time favorites remain, “Rainbow Butterfly,” “Letting Go of Stress,” “Easing Into Sleep,” and “Ten Minute Stress Manager.” Here’s more information from Dr. Miller about anxiety.

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  1. Diane
    Reply

    I just have to share this in the hopes it may help someone…Let me begin by saying that I’m aware there are different causes of anxiety, and I am in no way belittling anyone who may have a chronic mental illness. I can only share my short-term experience and how I received help….
    Out of the blue last week I begin having strange symptoms, raised blood pressure, light-headedness, panic and nausea. It was scary and I didn’t know what was going on. I went to the dr. and of course he did a few tests and said it sounded like anxiety and panic attacks, so out came the Rx pad for Lexapro and Zantac:(… I took them that night and got bad RLS, probably from the Lexapro, so I stopped taking them.
    The next day was bad, had several “episodes”, always followed by diarrhea, then I felt better. Weird. I started looking on the internet and first found dehydration, rehydrated, which helped and then I found info on PH balancing. I did have some PH test strips at home and did a urine sample. It was at the bottom of the chart acidic! Not good!
    I begun to eat more alkaline foods, and l drank some alkaline tea. The next day was a much better test, and I had a great day, no symptoms. Just tired.. I continued eating just a small amt of acidic food and mostly alkaline foods (mostly veggies, no fruit, little lean fish, lots of water), had one episode the next day, not fun, but then I was fine…Today I feel like my old self again! Plus, I’ve lost a few lbs…I’m just guessing there’s a relation between balancing my PH (7.30-7.40 is ideal) and not feeling like crap! There are PH food charts all over the internet… You might give it a try…

    • Aimee
      New Jersey
      Reply

      I have been having the same problem. It started around the of June, but wasn’t frequent. Lately, for the past month or so, I seem to get this reaction first thing in the morning. It then subsides about an hour later. I take a “calming” pill which helps. It is preventing me from doing some of the things I looked forward to doing since I am not working that much and am 66 years young.

      Would you explain a little bit more about the ph chart and how to obtain these. Also, when you speak about “acidic” foods, which foods would you be referring to. I’d be interested in learning more, because I am getting weary of having this feeling on a continual basis.
      Thank you for your comment.

  2. Lisa
    Reply

    I have been suffering with Anxiety since I was a small child. I am now 27 years old an have resigned myself to the fact that I will be living with this thing for the rest of my life. Anxiety rears it’s head in some very random, bizarre, embarrassing and debilitating ways.
    I’ve experienced it in so many different forms over the years that I’ve got enough symptoms to fill a bible-sized book.
    I don’t think you can label anyone as having any one form of anxiety – I’ve had at least 4 different ‘types’ – I firmly believe it is what it is; it can only be labelled as Anxiety (it’s far too complex a thing to be pigeon-holed).
    For example, I went through a phase of never wanting to be out in public, to having chronic nausea, to being obsessed with safe food handling, to being awake til the wee hours of the morning to grinding the living daylights out of my teeth in my sleep.
    I think trying to smack a label on things is where a lot of people go wrong- I don’t think anyone is just ‘OCD’ or that they have social anxiety.
    I’ve learnt over the years that even though friends, family or medical processionals may be there to listen, they will never ever truly understand what the person is going through. The absolute best medicine is to reach out to other people who are suffering with the same thing. I can tell you first hand that you will feel such a sense of calmness just from chatting with someone who really understands you.
    Other things that have helped me have been good old lavender oil, nice warm baths, massages, drinking plenty of water and (trying) to stick to a regular routine.
    I’ve never taken any of the anti-depressants the numerous doctors I’ve visit have been so happy to provide me with.
    I do suffer some pretty intense lows from time-to-time; but I now they’re just circumstantial. I really have a massive problem with doctors handing out these types of drugs as if they were candy. Some would offer them to me on my first visit!

  3. c.h.
    Reply

    It seems there are no truly effective drugs for anxiety. Good basis for a program? Also,
    Use of antidepressants to deal with anx. Symptoms may depleted dopamine system?
    And more!

  4. Carol Anne
    Reply

    Anxiety, most people view this term as fluff and they say its just everyday aggravations. Until you have been to the point of not being able to open the door to go outside that lasts almost a year, cannot drive the car out of fear, cannot be in a group of people without sheer panic, fear is terrible and I am glad there are meds to help deal with it.
    It is not a sign of weakness, it is an illness and not one that is fluff. You feel you cannot breathe, dizzy to almost passing out, nausea from fear… that is ‘anxiety’ and not fluff/weakness as most of society believes it is. I thought this until I went through all of this. Weakness is not a word I use anymore for anyone, we all have our own level of fears, some are deeper than other but fear none the less.

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