The skin is the largest organ in the body. And when something goes wrong with the skin, it is often very visible. This means skin problems can have psychological complications. Dr. Amy Wechsler is both a dermatologist and a psychiatrist. She can help her patients figure out when stress is aggravating their skin conditions, as well as how to minimize the social impact of problems like acne or psoriasis. Learn about treatments for rosacea, eczema, dry skin and wrinkles. She recommends Cetaphil cleanser or lotion and Cutemol for cracked fingertips. Guests: Amy Wechsler, MD, a family dermatologist practicing in New York City, board-certified in both dermatology and psychiatry. Her hospital appointments include Assistant Clinical Professor in Dermatology, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, and Adjunct Clinical Professor in Psychiatry, Weill Cornell Medical College. Her Web site is www.dramywechsler.com (Photo is of Dr. Wechsler) Hilary Baldwin, MD, President of the American Acne and Rosacea Society, Associate Professor and the Vice Chair of the Department of Dermatology at the State University of New York at Brooklyn.Click here to listen to our podcast.

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  1. RTH
    Reply

    I had chronic hives for 18 years. Finally took a combination of doxipine and zantac (must be taken together) at a large dose and weened off gradually over a year. I now take no meds and have no hives. Doxepine is an old antidepressant with antihistimine properties and zantac, associated with gut issues is also a histimine blocker

  2. Kin
    Reply

    My wife has had chronic hives for over 3 years. Each day, her patchy hives will appear over her lower limbs, her back and arms, and sometimes on her face, between 10 pm and 3 am. If she does not take an antihistimine tablet before bed time, her hives will appear, and she will not be able to sleep due to the itchy hives.
    She has seen her family doctor, and he has suggested that the only thing to do is to keep taking the antihistimine tablet to control the hives daily.
    Any suggestions or recommendations on her case?
    Regards,
    Kin.

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